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Welcome to The Arc Amplified!

Sharing stories of inclusion, advocacy, and empowerment across Snohomish County

A source for sharing stories of inclusion and belonging, bold activism and local change-makers in action.

The mission of this platform is to amplify diverse voices and “good news” stories from within the disability community in Snohomish County and across the region.

*The Arc Amplified is an online publication of The Arc of Snohomish County. Learn more about our mission and values at arcsno.org/about

Do you have a story of inclusion you want to share?

Are you leading local advocacy efforts? Has your family or loved one benefited from activities or programs in Snohomish County that are designed to advance community inclusion?

We want to know!

Send an email to:
Whitney Stohr
Parent to Parent Coordinator
whitney@arcsno.org
or call (425) 258-2459 x 106.

  • Week Without Driving Participation Doubles

    Week Without Driving Disability Rights WA 913 Press Release The Arc Amplified

    MEDIA ADVISORY:  September 13, 2022

    CONTACT:

    Anna Zivarts, Disability Mobility Initiative, Disability Rights Washington

    206 718 8432 - annaz@dr-wa.org

    Week Without Driving Participation Doubles, With Participation from Leaders Throughout Washington State

    For September 19: Next Monday, September 19 kicks off Disability Mobility Initiative’s 2022 Week Without Driving Challenge. Registration has more than doubled since last year’s event, with participation from elected leaders, transportation professionals and transit agencies across the state. 

    Participants include the mayors of Bellevue, Bothell, Issaquah, Olympia, Vancouver and Winthrop, and councilmembers from King, Pierce, Whatcom, Snohomish and Jefferson counties, as well as the councilmembers from the cities of Anacortes, Bellevue, Everett, Fircrest, Kenmore, Kirkland, Lacey, Liberty Lake, Mountlake Terrace, Millwood, Olympia, Port Angeles, Redmond, Seattle, Sedro-Woolley, Sequim, Tacoma and Yakima. Click here for a list of elected leaders who have registered so far.

    Week Without Driving Letter from WA Transit Agencies Small Graphic

    “If you can drive, and can afford a car, you may not understand what it’s like to rely on walking, rolling, transit and asking or paying for rides. But for nearly a quarter of the people in our state – people with disabilities, young people, seniors and people who can’t afford cars or gas, this is our every day,” said Anna Zivarts, Director of the Disability Mobility Initiative.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Week Without Driving Inslee Proclamation Small Graphic

     

     

    This year, the Week Without Driving received an official proclamation from Governor Jay Inslee and Washington State Department of Transportation is also inviting all staff to participate in the challenge, and through the transportation demand management program for state workers coordinated by the Thurston Regional Planning Council, state employees will be invited to take the #WeekWithoutDriving challenge as well.


    Fifteen transit agencies across the state have also endorsed the Week Without Driving, signing on to a letter where they encourage their agency staff, board and ridership to take the Week Without Driving challenge to better understand what it is like to not have the option to be able to drive yourself where you want to go.

    Anyone can register to participate at  WeekwithoutDriving.life. The Disability Mobility Initiative is specifically encouraging elected leaders, transportation professionals and transit providers to participate so they can start to understand the barriers nondrivers experience in accessing our communities. To prepare, read our stories collected in the Transportation Access for Everyone Storymap and check out highlights from our 2021 event. In this video, elected leaders who participated last year encouraged others to join in 2022. 

    Week Without Driving Sponsors Small Graphic

    The challenge is co-sponsored by Amazon, BERK and PRR. Co-hosts include: The Arc of Washington & the Arc of Snohomish County, All Aboard Washington, APIC Spokane, Bothellites for People Oriented Places, Cascade Bicycle Club, Center for Independence, Climate Solutions, Complete Streets Bellevue, Commute Seattle, CTANW, Downtown on the Go, Forevergreen Trails, Feet First, Front and Centered, Futurewise, Greater Spokane Progress, Hopelink, Kirkland Greenways, Leafline Trails Coalition, MLK Labor, Move Redmond, National Federation of the Blind of Washington State, People First of Washington & People First of Snohomish County, People for People, Seattle Neighborhood Greenways, Seattle Subway, Share the Cities, Sierra Club, Snohomish County Public Utility District, Snohomish County Transportation Coalition, Snoqualmie Valley Transit, Thurston Regional Planning Council, Transit Riders Union, Transportation Choices Coalition, Twin Star Credit Union, The Urbanist, Walk Roll Pierce County, Washington Council of the Blind, WA Sr. Lobby, Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility, Whatcom Smart Trips, 350 Seattle.

     
  • Why the Week Without Driving Challenge Matters for Snohomish County

    100. Why Week Without Driving Matters to Snohomish County The Arc Amplified

    Why the Week Without Driving Challenge Matters for Snohomish County

    The 2nd annual Week Without Driving Challenge will be held this year from September 19th through September 25th, 2022.

    People First of Snohomish County, a group by and for adult self-advocates with intellectual and developmental disabilities, is co-hosting the 2022 event with Disability Rights Washington (DRW), through their Disability Mobility Initiative.

    Together, DRW and People First of Snohomish County, along with community partners across the state, challenge elected officials and government leaders to commit to one week without driving. They challenge participants to go about their lives, for one week, utilizing alternative, non-driving options only. This may mean walking their kids to school, cycling to work, planning to reach their children’s extra-curricular activities or sports practices by bus, or relying on others to drive them to and from important meetings and appointments.

    Those who commit to this challenge will, no doubt, find it extremely challenging and, at times, exceedingly frustrating. And, they are only committing to one week!

    But, this is a daily reality for many people in our state, including individuals with disabilities.

    In discussing the upcoming Week Without Driving, the Snohomish County Transportation Coalition, known locally as SnoTrac, shared some important statistics around transit use in Snohomish County.

    “Much of our communities have been engineered to get around by a car…. People in Snohomish County’s areas underserved by transit are 240% more likely to say they will never take transit than people in well-served areas. Yet, people who are transportation-dependent, such as people with disabilities and low incomes, are 3-times more likely to use transit than transportation-independent individuals. As a result, dependent individuals, especially in rural areas, are more isolated and have greater difficulty getting and hold a job.”

    In our county, according to SnoTrac metrics, those who can drive, or are “transportation-independent,” are 7.7 times MORE LIKELY to hold jobs than those who are transportation-dependent. They are also more connected and less isolated as they are found to be 2.2 times MORE LIKELY than transportation-dependent individuals to take a trip for “non-commute purposes” (e.g. for enjoyment or to participate in community activities) in the past week than those considered transportation-dependent. (Read more at gosnotrac.org/week-without-driving.)

     

    This is why it is important to design our communities in a way that ensures reliable transit access for all. Public transportation and multi-modal connectivity in our communities must be prioritized.

    SnoTrac writes: “To make our communities more accessible, we need to: Expand transit and paratransit services, improve walking and bicycling infrastructure, ensure the transportation infrastructure is designed for people with disabilities, and build compact communities where housing, shopping, schools, jobs and services are located within walking and rolling distances.”

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    Whitney Stohr is the Leadership & Independent Living Program Manager at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is especially interested in caregiving policy and advocacy. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent and family caregivers. She lives with her spouse and their four-year-old son Malachi in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

     
  • Unseen Movie Documentary

    98. Unseen Documentary Screenings Sept. 2022 The Arc Amplified

    The Arc of Snohomish County and Community Partners Will Offer Limited Screenings of Award-Winning Caregiving Documentary “Unseen” on September 15, 16 & 17

    The Arc of Snohomish County, in partnership with community organizations located statewide, will offer THREE screenings of the newly released and award-winning documentary Unseen.

    This documentary film shines a light on the many challenges of caregiving and the physical and mental toll commonly experienced by parents and family caregivers raising children with developmental disabilities with high-support and/or complex healthcare needs.

    Virtual screenings will be held on September 15th, 16th and 17th, 2022. Each screening will be followed by a panel discussion featuring parent and family caregivers from across the state, as well as researchers who have focused their work on studying the personal, family and community wide impacts of caregiving. Registration is FREE, but space is limited.

    REGISTER USING THE LINKS BELOW:

    Thursday, September 15th @ 10 am - 12 Noon

    Link to register: https://tiny.one/UnseenThurs

    Friday, September 16th @ 6 - 8 pm

    Link to register: https://tiny.one/UnseenFri

    Saturday, September 17th @ 10 am - 12 Noon

    Link to register: https://tiny.one/UnseenSat

    Unseen Film Showing Panel Discussion 1

    More About the Film:

    “An estimated 16.8 million people in America are caring for a child with disabilities. Many parent caregivers for children or adults who are disabled or medically complex are exhausted and isolated. Their mental and physical struggle is a public health crisis that costs us all. The ‘Unseen’ documentary gives an unfiltered, honest glimpse into their lives to enable a change for millions of caregivers and their families.

     

    The film follows Jess and Ryan Ronne, a blended family with 8 children, including Lucas, who has profound disabilities requiring total care. Their situation has gotten more and more challenging as Lucas gets older and stronger. With limited resources and support, caregiving takes a toll on their physical and mental health.

     

    It is a common story among parent caregivers: the isolation, uncertainty about the future, lack of options, and a never-ending daily to-do list means the role of caregiver overpowers nearly every other facet of life. Video diaries from diverse caregivers featured in the film illustrate this universality, while interviews with mental health experts and policy/legal advocates provide a broader view on the societal impacts.” Learn more at caregiverdoc.com.

     

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    Whitney Stohr is the Leadership & Independent Living Program Manager at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is especially interested in caregiving policy and advocacy. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent and family caregivers. She lives with her spouse and their four-year-old son Malachi in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

     
  • Week Without Driving Challenge 2022

    96. Week Without Driving Challenge 2022 The Arc Amplified 1

    Week Without Driving Challenge 2022

    The 2nd annual Week Without Driving Challenge will be held September 19th ­- 25th, 2022.

    The Week Without Driving Challenge is a Disability Mobility Initiative led by Disability Rights Washington (DRW) and co-hosted by various community partners across the state. The challenge invites elected officials and other leaders to forego driving for a full week to better understand the difficulty and challenges of accessing community programs and services, as well as school or work, and other activities when you lack the option of driving.

    Participating in this challenge is also one way to raise awareness about the need for affordable, accessible and reliable public transportation and connectivity in city planning that ensures easy access to different modes of transportation.

    Anyone can participate in the Week Without Driving Challenge, share their personal experiences and raise awareness about these topics.

    Will you commit to a full week without driving?

    Sign up to join the #WeekWithoutDriving at tinyurl.com/mvuymc5p.

     

    Why is this important?

    As shared on the DRW website: “If you can drive or afford a car, you may not understand what it’s like to rely on walking, rolling, transit and asking for rides. But for nearly a quarter of the people in our state — people with disabilities, young people, seniors and people you can’t afford cars or gas, this is our everyday.”

    For individuals with disabilities, “access to transportation is consistently listed as one of the top concerns.” It is important that individuals have accessible, reliable and convenient access to goods and services, programs and places in their communities. However, that is too often not the case. There are far too many transportation barriers that impede access to the community.

    Furthermore, it is critical that elected officials understand these issues as access to a vehicle and the ability to independently drive from one place to another is an equity concern. Many individuals do not have a driver’s license and many others lack access to a vehicle. DRW further elaborates on this tie to equity: “Those of us who can’t drive or don’t have access to a car are more likely to be disabled, BIPOC and immigrants. We are also elders and young people, as well as those who can’t afford to own or maintain a vehicle.” (Read more here.)

    With a more personal understanding of these issues, elected officials and leaders who take part in the Week Without Driving Challenge can put their new knowledge to use through their legislative work and policymaking and by collaboratively planning vibrant communities that work for everyone.

    YOU’RE INVITED TO PARTICIPATE!!

     

     

    Learn more about the Week Without Driving Challenge at disabilityrightswa.org/programs/disabilitymobility.

    Additional Resources:

    Local News Stories:

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    Whitney Stohr is the Leadership & Independent Living Program Manager at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is especially interested in caregiving policy and advocacy. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent and family caregivers. She lives with her spouse and their four-year-old son Malachi in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

     
  • Find The Arc on Instagram!!

    97. The Arc on Instagram The Arc Amplified

    Find The Arc on Instagram!!

     

    The Arc of Snohomish County has a new Instagram page!

    Find us at the handle @ArcSnohomishLeads.

    As the page name suggests, our goal with this new account is to highlight and share news and updates on leadership development opportunities, as well as current advocacy efforts, programs and projects. We look forward to celebrating the community involvement and leadership of our staff members, many of whom play an incremental role in policy change and legislative advocacy at the local, county, state and national level through their connections with The Arc and other disability focused organizations.

    We also want to use this page to celebrate YOU! We want to highlight all of the ways that you and your family are involved in local leadership and advocacy. Whether it is at your child’s school, an after-school program, a local nonprofit organization, self-advocacy groups, a state-wide legislative coalition, or anything in between — we want to share it!

    If you have a leadership or advocacy story to share, contact Whitney Stohr, Leadership & Independent Living Program Manager, at whitney@arcsno.org.

     
  • Self-Advocacy Report: A Summary of Activities and Discussion from the July 2022 meeting of DDC

    95. DDC Report Quarter 2 2022 The Arc Amplified

    Self-Advocacy Report: A Summary of Activities and Discussion from the July 2022 Meeting of the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council

    Leigh Spruce, Self-Advocacy Coordinator at The Arc of Snohomish County, serves on the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council (DDC). She was appointed to membership on the DDC by Governor Jay Inslee in 2021.

    The role of DDC is to plan, implement and monitor the State Plan that exists to improve supports and services for individuals living with developmental disabilities and their families. The Council’s mission is to advocate, promote and implement policies and practices to create pathways to meaningful, integrated and productive lives for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) over the life course.

    DDC meets on a quarterly basis. Leigh Spruce shares a report each quarter following the statewide meeting. Below is her report on the July 2022 DDC membership meeting.

    The Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council met [in July 2022] to interview the final 3 candidates who were being considered for the [DDC] Executive Director position. They were interviewed separately. They were asked about their knowledge of the I/DD community, as well as past experience and life experience with this community as it relates to public policy with state government. Each candidate gave a short presentation on what the I/DD community meant to them. After the interviews, we had a discussion about what we thought of each one. We were able to decide who we liked the best of the three candidates and voted. The candidate will be notified at a later date.

     

    We broke off into working groups to examine what needs to be updated with the criteria regarding DDC and its role pertaining to various meetings and public policy, as well as membership and needed supports for the meetings.

     

    [DDC Policy Director] Adrienne Stuart will be stepping down in her role with the DDC at the end of the month [July 2022]. She gave a final summary on the North Star legislative project

     and hopes that the work that has been done will continue. She was pleased to share that because of it, there were important bills [last legislative session] which supported the I/DD community. We were able to lend our voices to getting some things passed through the legislature.

    Since the July 2022 meeting, the DDC announced the hiring of their new executive director Brandi Monts, who brings with her to this position her 23 years of experience working in residential services, employment, government, teaching, advocacy and consulting. Read more about Brandi Monts and her new role at the helm of DDC at tinyurl.com/2us4cdn3.

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    Leigh Spruce is a Self-Advocacy Coordinator at The Arc of Snohomish County. In this role she supports engagement activities and leadership and advocacy training for adults with disabilities in Snohomish County and across the Puget Sound region. She serves on numerous community boards and committees and is an engaged activist for disability rights. Contact: leigh@arcsno.org.

     
  • READ-ALOUD: Ribbit!

    97. Read Aloud Ribbit The Arc Amplififed 1

    READ-ALOUD: Ribbit!

     

    A group of frogs are living happily in a peaceful pond, until they discover a surprise visitor: a little, pink pig. Sitting contentedly on a rock in the middle of their pond, the pig opens his mouth and says: RIBBIT! The frogs are bewildered at first, and then a bit annoyed — “What did that little pig just say?” “Does he think he’s a frog?” “Is he making fun of us?”

    Soon the pig draws the attention of all the nearby animals; everyone is curious to know what he wants! After much guessing (and shouting) and a visit to the wise old beetle, the animals realize that perhaps the pig was not there to mock them after all — maybe he just wanted to make new friends! But is it too late?

     

    This is a warm, funny and beautifully illustrated story of friendship. (Read more at https://tinyurl.com/33wy3tur.)

    Join Whitney Stohr, Leadership & Independent Living Program Manager at The Arc of Snohomish County, as she reads: Ribbit!, by author Rodrigo Folgueira and illustrator Poly Bernatene (published 2013 by Knopf Books for Young Readers).

     

     
  • Point of View: The Hospital Hangover

    94. The Hospital Hangover The Arc Amplified

    Point of View: The Hospital Hangover

    The “hospital hangover.”

    It’s totally a thing.

    If you are a parent or family medical-caregiver, you know it is a thing.

    It is the day after you get home from a hospitalization with your child. You wake up with all the tell-tale signs of a long night out, minus the good stories and, of course, lacking the after-glow of a well-deserved evening of fun with friends.

    You feel like you were hit by a bus... or a train… or maybe even two trains, depending on the exact particulars of the recent stay.

    You are tired and groggy. Your joints ache and your movements bear an awfully closely resemblance to a snail trekking through a mountain of pudding. Your memory is fuzzy, and you keep forgetting the day of the week. Greasy, comfort food sounds delightfully tasty.

    You look around, and your house is an absolute disaster. There are piles of unwashed clothes strewn across the room. Unpacked duffels sit next to garbage bags filled to overflow with random boxes of half-used rubber gloves and syringe singles. Sure, it might feel like an extremely odd hangover, but a hangover nonetheless.

    It is a unique type of hangover.

    It is the hospital hangover.

    It lasts a day, maybe two; possibly the whole weekend following an admission.

    You may even experience a surprise hospital hangover the morning after a day-surgery or even a particularly long afternoon of back-to-back clinics. (I am convinced that those surprise hangovers are correlated directly to the stress of surgery and/or marathon appointments. The absence of an overnight stay does not necessarily detract from the hallmark brain-fog of the morning-after experience.)

    I shared once on my family’s Instagram account @rollin.w.spinabifida about my personal struggle-bus with the hospital hangover. I knew it had to be a thing and was quickly validated in that belief by dozens of messages from other parent caregivers. My fellow medical moms and dads jumped into my DMs with their shared experience of that dreaded hangover.

    Moral of the story: If you are a parent or family caregiver who wakes up the morning after a hospital discharge wondering if a large pine tree may have dislodged itself from the ground in the middle of the night and crashed right through the roof of your home to land squarely on top of you while you slept (probably not soundly) in bed… you are sooo not alone in that feeling.

    You are among friends here in the world of disability and medically-complex parenting.

    And, like any other hangover, the miracle “cure” is unique to the individual.

    What works for me?

    A slow morning-after with A LOT of coffee. I need time to re-acclimate. To breathe deeply. Even if the hospitalization was a single night, a single night is all it takes to ignite all the symptoms of a raging, migraine-inducing hangover. I desperately need those morning hours to reset my headspace.

    I ignore the mess. Yes, there are bags to unpack. There is a pile of hospital laundry to wash. There are medical supplies and equipment to put away. I am behind on work. My house needs to be cleaned. There is more “stuff” loaded in the back seat of our family car. Whatever…. That is a problem for an undefined “later” part of the day.

    I take a walk, and then another. A long, morning walk with a very large mug of hot coffee is usually the first “task” on my post-hospitalization to-do list. The sunshine and fresh air helps me refocus my mind and clarify my thoughts. It gets my body back up and moving in accordance with the rhythms of our regular home life. Often, the first day after a hospital stay is marked by several walks — a long morning march, a lunchtime stroll around the block, and another long afternoon dawdle.

    I spend the evening reclaiming my mental space. After bedtime on that first full day home, I unroll my yoga mat and spend time stretching, focusing, breathing. I apply a thick facemask and take a long, steaming shower. Then, I indulge in several of my go-to snack options and binge-watch old episodes of a favorite TV show. Simply, decompressing is the goal.

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    Whitney Stohr is the Leadership & Independent Living Program Manager at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is especially interested in caregiving policy and advocacy. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent and family caregivers. She lives with her spouse and their four-year-old son Malachi in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

     
  • How to Engage in Advocacy During the 2022 August Congressional Recess

    93. Advocacy During the 2022 August Recess The Arc Amplified

    How to Engage in Advocacy During the 2022 August Congressional Recess

    Each year, our national legislators in Congress recess for the month of August. They take this time away from Congress to return to their home states and, often, use the time to meet with constituents, attend events or participate in Town Hall meetings. This mid-year recess is an opportunity for advocates to engage their legislators and share their views, concerns and perspectives. (Click here to learn more about the annual August Recess.)

    The Arc of the United States recently shared a document with ideas and methods for engaging with elected legislators. Here are some ideas.

    Check the website of your members of Congress to see what options they have to connect with constituents this month. You may find in-person or virtual options. [Click here to identify your members of Congress.]

    Connect on Twitter! Snap a picture, post it on social media with a sentence or two about what you are advocating for, and tag your members of Congress. You can find a list of Congressional Twitter handles here: https://tinyurl.com/4fk8r6ae.

    Join town hall meetings hosted by your representatives and senators, encourage advocates to join, and ask questions about issues that are important to the disability community. You can find upcoming town hall meetings at townhallproject.com.

    Say thank you. Have your members of Congress recently supported legislation that is important to you? Thank them! Write an email, send a letter, or snap a picture to share on social media, tagging them in your thank you message.

    Connect with The Arc to join an in-person or virtual meeting with your legislators. Introduce yourself and talk about issues that are important to you and your family. [The Arc of Snohomish County can help connect you. Email us!]

    Draft an email to share your story and important issues with your legislators. You can also share your story and tag your legislators on social media.

    Learn more about policy issues of Federal importance on The Arc U.S. website at thearc.org/policy-advocacy.

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    Whitney Stohr is the Leadership & Independent Living Program Manager at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is especially interested in caregiving policy and advocacy. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent and family caregivers. She lives with her spouse and their four-year-old son Malachi in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

     
  • Local Disability Rights Advocates Attend New Arc Leadership Workshop

    Recap Arc Leadership Advocacy Workshop The Arc Amplified 2

    Local Disability Rights Advocates Attend New Arc Leadership Workshop on July 23rd

     

    The Arc of Snohomish County welcomed a dozen local disability rights advocates at a leadership training event on Saturday, July 23rd, 2022. Event trainees included parents and caregivers of children with developmental disabilities, adult self-advocates with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and leaders working professionally in the field.

    The Leadership & Advocacy Workshop launched a new biannual training program that The Arc hopes will further support and engage new and emerging voices leading the disability rights movement in Snohomish County and across the state.

    The workshop was developed and facilitated by Rachel Kube, The Arc’s Advocacy & Communications Coordinator, with support from other Arc staff members, who contributed presentations on leadership, advocacy, coalition-building, goal-setting and effective communication.

    During the event, trainees discussed what it means to be a leader, leadership qualities and skills, and different types of leadership styles. They learned about legislative advocacy and the policymaking process, how to engage in legislative advocacy, and what it means to advocate at the local, county and state levels. Trainees talked about disability policies and issues that are important to them and in which they hope to engage further as leaders and advocates.

    Leadership Workshop Word Cloud

    [Pictured: A word cloud created together by trainees listing the strengths and qualities they value in leadership.]

    The biggest take-away lessons from the July 23rd training:

    We are all leaders! Every single one of us has what it takes to lead, to advocate, to engage and to speak out on issues and policies that matter.

     

    There are different ways to lead! We can be a leader within our families, our neighborhood or our faith community. We can engage in local leadership, in our city or county, by joining workgroups or sitting on local boards or commissions. We can be a parent leader at our child’s school or PTA group. We can support a nonprofit organization, either as a board member, a donor, or an event volunteer or fundraiser. There are countless ways to serve and countless ways to lead.

     

    Are you interested in leadership?

    Are you interested in learning more about advocacy?

    If so, contact The Arc of Snohomish County, by email, at Whitney@arcsno.org, or by phone, at (425) 258-2459 x102, to share your leadership and advocacy interests and discuss possible opportunities to get involved.

    Our self-paced, virtual Arc Leadership Training curriculum is available to those interested in learning more about the history of the disability rights movement, current policies and areas in which advocates can get involved to create positive change. Contact Rachel@arcsno.org to learn more.

    We also offer training opportunities for self-advocates. Virtual workshops for self-advocates are scheduled for Thursday, August 4th, 2022, 1-3 PM, and Thursday, August 11th, 2022, 6-8 PM. Contact jessie@arcsno.org for more information. Adult self-advocates can also contact Leigh Spruce at leigh@arcsno.org to discuss their leadership goals.

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    https://www.linkedin.com/in/whitneystohr/">Whitney Stohr is the Leadership & Independent Living Program Manager at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent/family caregivers. She lives with her spouse and their four-year-old son Malachi in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

     

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The Arc of Snohomish County is currently working remotely: 

Monday - Friday from 10am - 3pm

127 E. Intercity Ave. Suite C
Everett, WA 98208

(425) 258-2459