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Recent Staff Promotions

63. New Staff Promotions April 2022 The Arc Amplified

The Arc of Snohomish County: Recent Staff Promotions

The Arc of Snohomish County recently promoted Alaina Kube from her previous role as a Parent to Parent Coordinator to the position of Family Support and Education Program Manager. As a program manager, Alaina will guide projects and activities through The Arc’s Connecting Families program, including Parent to Parent and Sibshop programs, support groups, speaker events, and more. You can contact Alaina Kube at (425) 258 2459 ext. 111 or alaina@arcsno.org.

Whitney Stohr will also transition this month from her previous role as a Parent to Parent Coordinator to Leadership and Independent Living Program Manager. In this role, she will oversee leadership, independent living, self-advocacy and advocacy staff and programming. You can contact Whitney Stohr at (425) 258-2459 ext. 106 or whitney@arcsno.org.

We also look forward to welcoming new staff members in the upcoming weeks, who will support the Connecting Families and Sibshops programs. Stay tuned!

Meet Lily Sommer – Arc Sibshop Super Sib!

65. Sibling Story Lily Sommer The Arc Amplified

Meet Lily Sommer – Arc Sibshop Super Sib!

Lily Sommer is one of our Super Sibs at The Arc of Snohomish County.

She is 10 years old and is the middle sibling, with two brothers, ages five and (almost) twelve. Of being the middle sibling, Lily says: “It is tough and exciting because you’re not the one always getting picked on and not the one always getting told what to do.” Totally makes sense!

In her free time, Lily enjoys drawing and playing video games. Roblox is her favorite. She also likes Minecraft. She is “in love with animals.” In fact, her whole family are cat lovers! They have a pet cat named Nemo — as in the movie Finding Nemo.

Lily’s family also plays board games together. They like to spend time outside, as well. Sometimes, Lily and her brothers will play video games together.

Lily likes making new friends. She has a lot of friends, especially in school. She has also attended Arc Sibshops for some time. Lily shared that she feels that it is very important for kids to meet other siblings who have brothers or sisters with disabilities.

The Arc of Snohomish County’s Sibshop program is a specially tailored program for children, ages 8 to 12, and teens, ages 13 to 18, who have siblings with developmental disabilities. Learn more about the national Sibshop program at siblingsupport.org.

A tidbit of sibling advice from Lily: Make sure your siblings stay safe and that you watch them carefully.

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Whitney Stohr is a Parent to Parent Coordinator at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent/family caregivers. She lives with her four-year-old son Malachi and husband Jason in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

Weekly Goal Setting for Self-Care:

62. Self Care Weekly Goal Setting The Arc Amplified

Weekly Goal Setting for Self-Care:

Aim for Small Wins!

 

As caregivers, we instinctually understand the importance of self-care.

We know how important it is to take care of ourselves. We may often hear phrases like “caregiver fatigue” and “caregiver burnout” from our children’s (or our own) care providers. The exhaustion of caregiving can feel relentless at times. The responsibility can feel so heavy, and, in those moments, we all know it!

Self-care, self-care, self-care… You know you need it! Of course you need it! And yet…

Everyone talks about self-care. It is an important topic for family caregivers. Self-care is essential in order for us to show up every day as our best selves — for ourselves, certainly, but also for our families, our kids, our partners and our communities.

And yet… For family caregivers, conversations around self-care always circle back to one, single issue: time.

It always comes back to finding the time for self-care, because…

How do you find time for self-care when caregiving alone keeps you running through your day?

How do you carve out time to prioritize your needs when you are responsible for meeting the needs of your children?

But, the answer is also just that: Time.

That is, we  — as family caregivers — must find the time!

We must carve out moments to take care of ourselves.

And we all know this, too, but HOW??? How do you do it?!

You continually remind yourself that self-care is essential care.

You create a self-care mantra for yourself that you repeat over and over and over again until it sticks.

You set timers and daily calendar events for self-care because it should be a part of your day, every single day.

You discover whatever it is that works for you.

And then, you do it because self-care is really that important.

Start small! The goal, after all, is to establish a practice of continuous self-care that is sustainable and consistent over time. Caregiving is a long game, after all! (Click here for a previous blog post on the topic: “Creating a Self-Care Strategy in Three Steps”)

Another way to begin the practice of prioritizing self-care is to commit to one or two acts of self-care each day. In no way must these acts come anything close to grand gestures of self-love. Small — start small! These can be simple acts such as carving out time for a nightly skin care routine before bed or sitting outside by yourself for five minutes each afternoon before making lunch for the kids.

Simple acts of self-care.

That is the starting goal.

Here is a weekly self-care focused calendar to get your started.

Self Care Goals Weekly Calendar

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Whitney Stohr is a Parent to Parent Coordinator at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent/family caregivers. She lives with her four-year-old son Malachi and husband Jason in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

National Siblings Day — April 10th

April 10th National Sibling Day The Arc Amplified

A Celebration of Siblings on National Siblings Day — April 10th

 

Let’s hear it for our SIBS!! On April 10th, we celebrate National Siblings Day!

According to the Siblings Day Foundation, “Siblings Day follows the spirit of Mother’s Day and Father’s Day, an uplifting celebration honoring people who have helped in our development and who have shaped our values, beliefs, and ideals.”

At The Arc of Snohomish County, we celebrate siblings every day! Through our Sibshops program, we support kids and teens, ages 8 through 18, who have a sibling with a developmental disability. The concept of Sibshops was founded through the work of the Sibling Support Project, a national program “dedicated to the life-long and ever-changing concerns of millions of brothers and sisters of people with special health, developmental, and mental health concerns.” (Learn more about the Sibling Support Project at siblingsupport.org.)

 

The Arc of Snohomish County currently offers Sibshops for siblings ages 8 to 12 and a Teen Sib program for youth ages 13 to 18. For information about upcoming Sibshops, visit our online event calendar at arcsno.org/calendar.

Additional support and resources for the siblings of children with disabilities can be found on the Sibling Leadership Network website: siblingleadership.org; and in the books and publications of the Sibling Support Project: siblingsupport.org/publications.

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Whitney Stohr is a Parent to Parent Coordinator at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent/family caregivers. She lives with her four-year-old son Malachi and husband Jason in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

Child Abuse Prevention Month

Child Abuse Prevention Month 2022 The Arc Amplified 1

Wear Blue on April 1st for Child Abuse Prevention Month

 

The month of April is recognized nationally as Child Abuse Prevention Month.

Child Abuse Prevention Month is an annual observance for education and awareness raising around issues of child abuse prevalence and prevention. Informational events are typically held throughout the month of April and many organizations get involved.

Wear Blue on April 1stOne way to help raise awareness is to participate in Wear Blue Day on Friday, April 1st. Wear your favorite blue outfit, snap a photo, and share on social media using the hashtag #WearBlueDay2022. Click here for ready-made social media posts from the national nonprofit Prevent Child Abuse America.

Prevent Child Abuse America is also hosting a Digital Advocacy Day on Wednesday, April 27th. Click here if you are interested in learning more about digital advocacy and how to participate.

The symbol for Child Abuse Prevention Month is the pinwheel.

The Washington State Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF) shared that, this year, on March 31st, thousands of blue and silver pinwheels will be planted on the grounds of the state capitol building in Olympia, as part of a national “Pinwheels for Prevention” campaign. Additionally, close to 15,000 pinwheels were distributed to organizations across the state to support their awareness programs.

Child abuse prevention programs are particularly important within the disability community as individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are significantly more likely to experience abuse than people without disabilities. Click here to access a Resource Guide, created by The Arc of Spokane’s Sexual Abuse Awareness & Response Program, designed to support children, teens and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Additional Materials & Resources for Kids:

  • WA DCYF “Protective Factors” coloring book: com/4vehjj8w
  • WA DCYF annual “Child Abuse Prevention” coloring page: com/9632k4cw

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Whitney Stohr is a Parent to Parent Coordinator at The Arc of Snohomish County. She is passionate about advocating for medically complex children and children with disabilities and their families. She is a mom and medical caregiver herself, who is energized by working closely with other parent/family caregivers. She lives with her four-year-old son Malachi and husband Jason in Lynnwood. Connect with her on Instagram @rollin.w.spinabifida. Contact: whitney@arcsno.org.

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127 E. Intercity Ave. Suite C
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(425) 258-2459